Site de rencontre pour ado en guadeloupe

How would you describe your decade? What has changed for you since you started out? A designer can work in one of two ways. On the one hand, you can design, send your sketches to the reencontre, and wait for them to come back. On the other hand, you can do things the Dior way, where Se sketch is a starting point to discuss with the head of the ateliers. You guadelooupe it as a reference point, and invert it, transfigure it, creating the pieces as you go along, in the artisanal way, right on the model. The work-in-progress method is more enriching. Guadelope men at the atelier have been tailors for 40 years, and their methods are rather rigid.

When you want to change everything, you have to negotiate. It considerably enriches the development process, even if you end up getting into disputes now and then. I love that because, for me, man is in every way a combination of rules guaddeloupe codes. The tailors have their rules and know-how. But man bows to codes as an individual, too, because he gjadeloupe to belong to a group — identify with a certain kind of music, work on Wall Street, or belong gguadeloupe a Dating in high school meme team. He finds it comforting. But every group has its dress code, its rules of conduct.

It tells renckntre what music to Sitr to, Site de rencontre pour ado en guadeloupe what car to drive. Men Site de rencontre pour ado en guadeloupe their codes. Me, I like codes because Sluts in kymin can be broken. I like having three manuals clash on a single figure. Skaters, for example, have Siet different manual than rockers, but they follow a similar logic, because within Site de rencontre pour ado en guadeloupe group they listen to the same music, wear the same jeans, use the same skates or instruments. When you bring these different codes into confrontation, you get the effect of wheels within wheels, which then allows you to look at the codes from a new angle and switch off your automatic pilot.

All this to say that man is a collection of very precise rules, methods, and logical systems that I like to contrast in my thinking. I take the same approach to the people at the atelier, who also work with well-established rules. I really enjoy that. I learned the difference between costumes, theater, and fashion. For me, the best ideas are the ones that, in the end, are wearable. There are, of course, differing ideas on what is wearable. I see young people who are much freer in this regard than I have ever been. Do you think Belgium is still a point of reference in terms of design and sensibility, or has everything become diluted into Europe? And I love the French side of Dior. We can nonetheless say that Belgian designers are more cerebral, less decadent, more introverted and poetic.

You also have to do some digging to understand the story. We have to accept the phenomenon and put the positive aspects to use. I find it fantastic that anybody anywhere can take a little phone and access all the information there is. When I was 15 or 16 years old, I had to take a train to buy an international fashion magazine. Back then, we had to venture out to seek information. Today, everyone has access to everything, which is an advantage. The problem is that people consume without doing any digging, without thinking. Anyone can pose as a journalist, or a critic, or a specialist. I think we need to engage in more self-criticism, and criticism of that sort is getting rarer.

What is a shame, though, is that certain good magazines are disappearing. A designer rarely lasts more than a decade! No need to press the point. Karl Lagerfeld for example! But you have to sustain the inspiration. Where do you go to seek it out? I think pleasure is the fundamental engine. I deeply love my work. This might be a somewhat romantic or even old-fashioned notion, but the fashion that speaks to me — the shows that have left their mark on me in the past — have always been the shows where I felt I was being immersed in a story. Many shows today exhibit pretty pieces and pretty figures, but then model three will have nothing to do with model seven.

They might be right two seasons from now, but not today. That will not happen. If I admire the person in question, it can rencontre femme ottignies only be interesting to watch. Amid the current overdose of information, Instagram is a tool that allows me to turn the focus onto what has touched me personally, what has seduced me recently. It serves as a sort of filter. What does it do for the characters in my shows if I show myself going out to dinner with friends? The city seems to be undergoing a renaissance right now. At any rate, for me Paris has always been the center. That has never come into doubt.

For me, Dior is the Parisian fashion house par excellence. Because it was a brand that carried my name. I was taking no pleasure in things anymore. But when you stop having fun, you lose sight of the big picture. A start-up has plenty of advantages. I long appreciated the contrast with Dior, where everything was much more serious and institutional, where you had to follow certain rules, and so forth. But those 10 years at a start-up tired me out. The result of making this decision to halt my brand was that I got a sort of second wind at Dior.

Since I was no longer split between two brands, I could devote all of my energy to one. You sustain tradition and modernity. You get them to coexist without clashing. The sartorial is very important at Dior. I find it marvelous not to have to choose.




Select a category

The result of making this decision to halt my brand was that I got a sort of second wind at Dior.

Site de rencontre ado 71

Back then, we had to venture out to seek information. Certain men at the atelier have been tailors for 40 years, and their methods are rather rigid. What has changed for you since you started out? The problem is that people consume without doing any digging, without thinking.