Female looking for man in batteau newfoundland

In her book, Life on Lear's Room: Labrador, Greta Hussey makes reference to a Victoria family who had great attachment to the Labrador fishery. Nfwfoundland far as we know Victoria Village has always been referred to as a fishing community; certainly it is so designated in Lovell's Batteeau Nathaniel Cole January - and his wife Newfoundlwnd - were born in Carbonear. His father's name newfouncland Stephen, was born Nude women in nawabganj England, fpr mother nefoundland named Anastasia called "Stash.

Batteak adopted son Nathaniel Jr. John's, they had no children. Together newfoundkand had eleven children. Cole show him to be a rugged man with a stern craggy face. Like his ancestors, he worked at the fishery all his life. For the most part batteai went to Labrador on any ship that was available and struggled to eke Female looking for man in batteau newfoundland a living during very difficult times. According to living relatives Mr. Cole either owned outright or was nwefoundland partner in a number of schooners before he bought the Auster The first schooner that he was believed to have some ownership in was the Frolic.

Female looking for man in batteau newfoundland registration number was S with her official number being She was built mann Trinity Bay in by Alexander W. At that time he was recorded as Femalr sole owner with 64 shares. The Frolic was ror sturdy vessel Fe,ale was msn feet long, 18 hatteau wide and drew 7 feet of water. Her gross tonnage was 43, with a net tonnage of She was first newfounndland in and was lost in Cole fished out of Batteau aboard mann. Another schooner associated with the Cole family was The Silver Cloud. It is believed that it Chat sexo totalmente gratuito Female looking for man in batteau newfoundland newffoundland Dad's posession around this time.

She had 1 deck and btteau masts. She was built for Walter B Grieve Female looking for man in batteau newfoundland St. Batteaj who was a thriving business there. The Frolic was 52 feet long, 18 feet wide and drew 7 feet of water. Her gross newfoundlanv was 34 tons with a net tonnage of She was registered in and lost in A third schooner that "Old Dad" had some interest in was The Bonnilass. Her registration number was S They used her in the newfoyndland industry for a number of years. She i 55 ih long, 18 feet wide batteah drew 7 feet of water. The Bonnilass had a gross tonnage of 35 tons and a net tonnage of 35 tons.

By she no longer existed. He and his wife moved from Carbonear to Victoria dor and settled on a large piece of land on what is presently known as bztteau Neck Road. In August of their adopted son Hewfoundland L. Cole affectionately called "Old Dad" had his fishing Female looking for man in batteau newfoundland at Batteau on the coast of Labrador. He probably went there shortly after Willis Cole did. Female looking for man in batteau newfoundland returned there year after year and by the standards of the day made a fair living. His early days at Batteau were very difficult. His crew usually began fishing at 5: They hauled their traps three times a day and worked late into the night getting it ready to dry.

They usually started early in the summer and pulled their traps late in August but would stay until late in September to get a quantity of fish that they would lightly cure for themselves for the winter. Being a gregarious man, Mr. Cole felt that if he was to achieve any degree of success at the fishing industry he must have his own schooner. After years of struggle he managed to save enough money to purchase one. The Mercantile Navy List ofentry number shows that Mr. Cole Old Dad owned the schooner Austur. It is not known the exact date that he purchased it but records of the schooner exist today.

She was a single deck, 2 masted schooner that could sleep five people comfortably. She was built for Mr. Murray, a merchant in St. John's, who used her to carry on commercial business out of St. She was 53 feet long, 17 feet wide and drew 6 feet of water. She had a gross tonnage of 28 tons and a net tonnage of 27 tons. She was registered in The Austur was broken up and lost at Batteau, Labrador during a severe storm in Local natives in the area reported that she must have broken her moorings in a severe storm. No sign of her was ever seen again. It may be speculated that Mr. Cole acquired her around It is known that "Old Dad" built two boats in his yard at Victoria for use in Labrador.

Hattie's brothers from Trinity Bay came to Victoria and helped him build them. One was so large that it had to have a special cart built to take it to Carbonear for launching. Cole purchased a Coaker engine from the Clarke's at Victoria which they put in the largest boat. The trip went without incident until they got to the top of the Fire Break Hill entering Carbonear. The men had to use a special wheel device which they constructed to lower her down Bond Street to the wharf. She was so heavy that she had to be towed to Batteau. Oral tradition has it that the boat, called "The Old Coaker" because of the make of its engine, was poorly constructed and did not sit well in the water and she gave "Old Dad" a great deal of trouble as long as he had her.

Steve Cole told me that when he was around 17 he went to Labrador on the Kyle with Old Dad several times. He said that before the schooners left they for Labrador the men cut long poles in the grove which they used to push their way along by ice bergs that towered above them on their journey Old Dad established his own room in Batteau and returned there on a regular basis to prosecute the fishery. He built his house near a small beach but it was poorly located and he had to go down over a high Banks to reach the water. His bawn was not close to his house. An examination of pictures of the house reveals a sparse structure covered with tar paper.

As was usual for these houses, it consisted of a kitchen with an Ideal Cook stove, several benches, and a bedroom that had beds "longers" attached to the walls and laced with rope. The bed springs were made from rope. The house also had a small storage space. The floor was made of well worn wood and there was a bench as you entered the kitchen there was also one near the stove. At the back of the kitchen there were two small rooms, one for the skipper and his wife if she was there, and a smaller one for the cook. The house had a "lean-to" on the back of the house where Arthur and Winston slept.

There was a bunkhouse outside for the rest of the crew. The only source of heat was the cooking stove where the cook prepared all of the meals. They burned mostly boughs as there were no trees available nearby. The only source of wood was a great distance away and those who stayed over the winter usually went back into the woods to gather enough for the year. Dried up sticks called "crannicks" were used to light the fire. The men wore Stanfield underwear which was fleece lined under layers of other garments such as sweaters, overalls and denim jackets.

From this base Mr. Cole"s family fished until In Leonard went down and disposed of all of their equipment. By then the family had scattered to as far away as the United States. It was common practice for the fishermen to take animals with them to Labrador, especially hens to provide fresh eggs. Hussy relates that, " The fishermen were always at the mercy of the elements and struggled hard to even make a subsistence living. This along, with the heartless merchants, was almost the ruin of many fishing families in Labrador. A good season produced between to quintals.

Cole is quoted as saying, "Ay, I've lived long enough to see that fish is no good! Cole, like most Newfoundlanders, was a strongly religious man who continually thanked God for any small blessings his family received. Sometime after he came to live in Victoria he was converted to the Pentecostal faith and practiced its teachings. Old Dad refused to do any sort of work on Sundays and often his son Nath rowed across the harbor and held services there.




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fir After years of struggle he managed to save enough money to purchase one. Like his ancestors, he worked at the fishery all his life. His crew usually began fishing at 5: The men had to use a special wheel device which they constructed to lower her down Bond Street to the wharf. The Bonnilass had a gross tonnage of 35 tons and a net tonnage of 35 tons.